The jilting of granny weatherall analytical essay

By following Granny, the reader is able to realize how sick Granny actually is by the descriptions used. We realize that Cornelia and the doctor are whispering right when Granny realizes it since we are following her so closely. If this story were told in first person, it would probably be told by Granny, with changes such as 'I meant to wave goodbye, but it was too much trouble.' Alternatively, if it was told in third person omniscient, we would not only get to know Granny's thoughts but also Cornelia's and Doctor Harry's thoughts as well. But, because it is told in third person limited, we stay close to Granny, knowing what she's thinking and feeling as the story unfolds.

It also allows authors to make use of multiple voices in a story. By experiencing a narrative through multiple voices, readers can look into the depths of the story. In addition, readers can have an objective interpretation of the characters and events, in contrast to more personal or subjective interpretations. Finally, an omniscient narrator allows for a better storytelling, as it involves multiple characters, and several plot lines with different interpretations of the same event. Thus, a story could be more interesting when the plot moves from character to character.

Alexandre Dumas  | Alfred Bester  | Algernon Blackwood  | Ambrose Bierce  | Arthur C. Clarke  | Arthur Conan Doyle  | Bram Stoker  | Charles Dickens  | Clifford Simak  | Edgar Allan Poe  | Frederik Pohl  | Guy de Maupassant  | Harlan Ellison  | Henry James  | Henry Kuttner  | . Wells  | Honoré de Balzac  | . Lovecraft  | Isaac Asimov  | John Wyndham  | Joseph Conrad  | Jules Verne  | Kurt Vonnegut  | Lord Dunsany  | Mary Shelley  | . James  | Murray Leinster  | Nathaniel Hawthorne  | Philip K. Dick  | Poul Anderson  | Ray Bradbury  | Robert Bloch  | Robert Heinlein  | Robert Louis Stevenson  | Robert Sheckley  | Robert Silverberg  | Rudyard Kipling  | Stephen Vincent Benét  | Theodore Sturgeon  | Washington Irving  |

Additionally, Porter uses simile and metaphor to describe the process of dying. [4] Early in the story, Porter uses images of floating to convey Granny's state of mind as she wavers in and out of consciousness. Granny's "bones felt loose, and floated around in her skin". "Doctor Harry floated like a balloon around the foot of the bed." "The pillow rose and floated under her." However, as Granny’s death becomes imminent, the tone changes, and Porter uses images of darkness and falling to describe Granny’s worsening condition. "Her heart sank down and down, there was no bottom to death." In describing the moment Granny dies, Porter writes, "She stretched herself with a deep breath and blew out the light."

The jilting of granny weatherall analytical essay

the jilting of granny weatherall analytical essay

Additionally, Porter uses simile and metaphor to describe the process of dying. [4] Early in the story, Porter uses images of floating to convey Granny's state of mind as she wavers in and out of consciousness. Granny's "bones felt loose, and floated around in her skin". "Doctor Harry floated like a balloon around the foot of the bed." "The pillow rose and floated under her." However, as Granny’s death becomes imminent, the tone changes, and Porter uses images of darkness and falling to describe Granny’s worsening condition. "Her heart sank down and down, there was no bottom to death." In describing the moment Granny dies, Porter writes, "She stretched herself with a deep breath and blew out the light."

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